Estate Planning Should Provide Comfort  

Let's help give you peace of mind

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Or you can call us at (800) 548-8138.

Probate-09

Arrange for Probate of Your Will

 

Pay-12

Collect Money Owed to Your Estate, Notify Creditors and Pay Debts and Claims

Inventory-10

Collect and Inventory Your Estate Assets

 

Invest-1

Manage and Invest Your Assets During the Administration Process

Family Heart-14

Distribute the Remaining Estate Assets

Help-11

Provide for the Immediate Needs of Your Family During the Administration Process

Paperwork-13

File All Required Tax Returns

Are you ready to make plans?
Let's have a conversation.

SCHEDULE A MEETING HAVE A QUESTION? WE'LL CALL YOU BACK.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Why do I need a Will?

A will outlines how your affairs are handled after your death. You may want to preserve your assets for your family and friends, and direct specific property or specific amounts of property to specific people. If you have minor children, you would want to designate a guardian for them. You may also want to minimize taxes and makes things as easy as possible for your family.

What does an Executor do?

Your executor is the person who is responsible for settling your estate. This means gathering together your assets, paying your debts and death taxes, and making distribution to your beneficiaries. The executor is responsible for keeping property insured, deciding what should be sold, investing cash, getting appraisals and filing income tax returns.

What happens if I die without a will and a trust?

With the exception of assets that will be passed to your beneficiary by designation or operation of law, your state’s probate laws will determine how your assets are distributed in the absence of a will. Many states have different rules related to the distribution of a deceased person’s assets when no will is presented for probate.

What is the difference between a will and a trust?

The main differences between a will and a trust are:

  •  Wills become effective after death. Some trusts are effective upon creation.
  • Wills direct who receives property upon death and appoint a legal representative to administer this process. A trust can distribute property prior to death.
  • Trusts cover only property in the trust. Wills cover anything owned by the person creating the will.
  • Wills are public record. Trusts are private.